1989-90 Int’l Trans-Antarctica Expedition

December 2010 marks the 20th anniversary of the 1989-90 International Trans-Antarctica Expedition, a historical 3,741-mile, 222-day expedition on the longest possible route across the frozen continent. Team members from six nations gather for the first time in Minnesota to reflect on the past and rekindle life-long friendships. Will Steger speaks with local CBS affiliate, WCCO about the the reunion.

1989-90 International Trans-Antarctica Expedition Reunion

On March 3, 1990, a team of six men from six different countries and their 42 sled dogs completed the first-ever dogsled crossing of the Antarctic continent. The 1990 International Trans-Antarctica Expedition, led by Minnesotan Will Steger, traveled 3,741 miles in seven months, enduring temperatures as low as -54F and winds as high as 100 mph. In early December 2010, the team will gather for the first time in 20 years to reflect on their journey and its impact, felt around the world by both lawmakers and school children.

Antarctic vs Arctic Comparison Guide

The Polar Regions are experiencing warming temperatures at more than twice as fast as they are for the planet as a whole. Sea ice is melting. Arctic wildlife and people are beginning to live altered lives. Learn about the impacts to the top and bottom of our planet.

KARE-11, 1986 North Pole Expedition 25th Anniversary Reunion

View KARE11’s coverage of the anniversary. Twenty five years ago this month, an expedition team reached the North Pole after enduring 56 days and 1,000 miles across fractured, shifting sea ice in temperatures that dipped below -70 degrees Fahrenheit. The epic ski and dogsled trek with its eight-member, 49-dog crew was a deliberate throwback to the days of the early explorers. This accomplishment, the first confirmed trek to reach the Pole without resupply, was deemed by National Geographic “a landmark in polar exploration.”

KSTP-TV, Jason Davis – 1986 North Pole Expedition 25th Reunion

Watch KSTP’s coverage of the anniversary. Twenty five years ago this month, an expedition team reached the North Pole after enduring 56 days and 1,000 miles across fractured, shifting sea ice in temperatures that dipped below -70 degrees Fahrenheit. The epic ski and dogsled trek with its eight-member, 49-dog crew was a deliberate throwback to the days of the early explorers. This accomplishment, the first confirmed trek to reach the Pole without resupply, was deemed by National Geographic “a landmark in polar exploration.”

North Pole ’86 25th Anniversary Recap

It was an honor to host the 25th Anniversary of the Steger International Expedition to the North Pole with the Minnesota Historical Society and the Consulate General of Canada in May. The eight-member expedition team, from across the U.S., Canada and New Zealand, returned to Minnesota to celebrate a series of events. We hosted an Expedition Family Day for over 650 people who experienced hands-on activities about expedition life, sled dogs, and climate impacts on the Arctic. We also featured an evening public program at the MN History Center and the team spoke with local TV stations, CG supporters and elected officials. The team joined the Canadian Consulate for lunch and Wilderness Inquiry for a canoe trip down the Mississippi River with school children and conservation partners.

North Pole 25th Anniversary Reunion

WCCO-TV covers the 1986 North Pole Expedition’s 25th reunion, held at the Minnesota History Center.

TPT – Almanac, MN Public Television – 1986 North Pole Expedition 25th Reunion

Watch TPT’s coverage of the monumental trip. Twenty five years ago this month, an expedition team reached the North Pole after enduring 56 days and 1,000 miles across fractured, shifting sea ice in temperatures that dipped below -70 degrees Fahrenheit. The epic ski and dogsled trek with its eight-member, 49-dog crew was a deliberate throwback to the days of the early explorers. This accomplishment, the first confirmed trek to reach the Pole without resupply, was deemed by National Geographic “a landmark in polar exploration.”

WCCO – North Pole Reunion Event with Ann and Will

Watch WCCO’s coverage of the 25th anniversary of the polar expedition. Featuring Will Steger and Ann Bancroft.

WCCO-TV, 1986 North Pole Expedition 25th Anniversary Reunion

Twenty five years ago this month, an expedition team reached the North Pole after enduring 56 days and 1,000 miles across fractured, shifting sea ice in temperatures that dipped below -70 degrees Fahrenheit. The epic ski and dogsled trek with its eight-member, 49-dog crew was a deliberate throwback to the days of the early explorers. This accomplishment, the first confirmed trek to reach the Pole without resupply, was deemed by National Geographic “a landmark in polar exploration.”

Will Steger Presentation Open

Opening sequence created for Will Steger presentations.

Eyewitness Voices: North Pole Expedition Team on Climate Change Impacts in the Arctic

We were impressed by the wealth of knowledge team members shared and their own eyewitness stories: Canadians Richard Weber and Brent Boddy talked about a loss of thick, old, multi-year ice, shortened dogsledding seasons and the loss of the summer sea ice in the Arctic Ocean; wildlife biologist, Geoff Carroll provided his insight into impacts to Alaska’s large land mammals he studies, like caribou and musk ox; New Zealand team member Bob McKerrow, who now works for the International Red Cross in Sri Lanka, talked about communities in the Bay of Bengal being squeezed out by rising water levels; and Bob Mantell talked about the impact of the BP oil spill on communities in New Orleans, where he lives. Paul Schurke joined Will with a call to action to address climate change; and Ann Bancroft acknowledged the impact the expedition had on her career and thanked the team and all of Minnesota for the gifts afforded her and the entire team.

The Changing Arctic: Int’l Cooperation and Development, Part 1

The changes in the Arctic are relevant right here in the “North Star” state, where there’s a rich tradition of polar exploration, as well as Arctic scientific and educational work. Canada and the United States have long collaborated in the Arctic as neighbours and friends. In the harsh environment of the Arctic, the two nations break ice for each other, fight forest fires, perform search and rescue, build transportation and technologi- cal infrastructure, and maintain a sophisticated system of early warning to reinforce continental security.

The Changing Arctic Int’l Cooperation and Development – Pt 2 Keynote

The changes in the Arctic are relevant right here in the “North Star” state, where there’s a rich tradition of polar exploration, as well as Arctic scientific and educational work. Canada and the United States have long collaborated in the Arctic as neighbors and friends. In the harsh environment of the Arctic, the two nations break ice for each other, fight forest fires, perform search and rescue, build transportation and technological infrastructure, and maintain a sophisticated system of early warning to reinforce continental security.