Educating others is a key solution to climate change as it builds climate literacy. The more people that are knowledgeable about the issue and comfortable talking about it’s impact on their lives, the bigger impact we can have as a society.

Research shows that to take action on climate change, people need:

  • A personal connection to climate change
  • Social support – people to talk to!
  • Hope – evidence of solutions, things we can do to be part of them
  • Incentives and rewards

We recommend educating others about the issue and why you are concerned about it and what you are doing about to address climate change.

Educating the Public

Educating Students

Are you an educator? Teach your students about climate change. Climate Generation has an entire curricula suite about climate change and energy education.

  • curriculua suite1Our Changing Climate for grades 3-6: These five lesson plans are interdisciplinary in nature, standards-based, help students master the requisite background information on global climate change processes and how to communicate about the issue using communication strategies, and are free for download.
  • Our Changing Climate for grades 6-12: These six interdisciplinary lesson plans help students master the requisite background information on global climate change processes, the importance of the Arctic to global climate, the potential effects of global warming in the Arctic, and to consider what could/should be done in response.
  • Next Generation Climate for grades 6-8: Next Generation Climate is a six lesson, interdisciplinary, middle school climate change curriculum that has students investigate the cause of the global temperature change, research the major repercussions of climate change, and find out how they can monitor and minimize those repercussions. Next Generation Climate allows students to dive deep into graphs and data and practice the skills of argumentation and engineering design.
  • Citizen Climate for grades 9-12: Citizen Climate is for high school students and focuses on global climate solutions. This curriculum emphasizes civic engagement and helps teachers and students understand the critical and complex climate solutions being discussed on the national and international stage, including equity in climate change international negotiations.
  • Minnesota’s Changing Climate for grades 3-12: This set of lesson plans explores Minnesota’s unique biomes and what a changing climate will mean for the state. It is considered a model for place based climate change education.
  • Experience Energy for grades 3-8: These lessons introduce students to energy basics, emphasizes the connection between our energy use and consumption, the resulting impact on our climate and energy solutions that mitigate its impact.
  • Baffin Island Expedition Supplement for Grades 3-12: Read exciting written journal entries from Will Steger and partners on their expedition to Baffin Island, documenting the impact of global warming on the Arctic environment. Expeditions are linked to lesson plans for grades 3-12.
  • Ellesmere Island Expedition Supplement for Grades 3-12: Read exciting written journal entries from Will Steger and partners on their expedition to Ellesmere Island, documenting the impact of global warming on the Arctic environment. Expeditions are linked to lesson plans for grades 3-12.

A People’s Curriculum for the Earth: A collection of articles, role plays, simulations, stories, poems, and art to help breathe life into teaching about the environmental crisis.

Climate Change Fiction (Cli-Fi): A new genre of literature that deals with climate change, often for young adults.

Links to podcasts:

  • Climate Cast is a podcast featuring MPR meteorologist Paul Huttner discussing the latest research on our changing climate and the consequences we’re seeing here in Minnesota and worldwide.
  • Warm Regards is a podcast about the warming planet. The show is hosted by meteorologist Eric Holthaus. Co-hosts are Jacquelyn Gill, a paleoecologist at the University of Maine, and Andy Revkin, a veteran journalist at the New York Times.