Day 36

Sigrid_02.jpgDay 36
Position: N 79° 58′ W 096° 32′
Distance traveled: 25 km / 15.5 mi
Estimated Temperature: -25 °C /-4 °F

The sleds are under a lot of pressure. When we are fully loaded they weigh around 750 to 800 lbs. We are running with sleds that are made for rough ice and heavy loads. They basically look like traditional Inuit sleds, about 4.5 meters long and are made out of wood. Every loose part is lashed to the sled with rope. Now and then we have to tighten the ropes on the bed of the sled and the handlebars. The ropes make the sled somewhat flexible and they move nicely over the rough ice. We do flip over sometimes and we have managed to brake the handlebars on all three sleds. We patch them up with pieces off wood and rope.

Sigrid_02.jpg
Sigrid_03.jpg

Day 36
Position: N 79° 58′ W 096° 32′
Distance traveled: 25 km / 15.5 mi
Estimated Temperature: -25 °C /-4 °F

The sleds are under a lot of pressure. When we are fully loaded they weigh around 750 to 800 lbs. We are running with sleds that are made for rough ice and heavy loads. They basically look like traditional Inuit sleds, about 4.5 meters long and are made out of wood. Every loose part is lashed to the sled with rope. Now and then we have to tighten the ropes on the bed of the sled and the handlebars. The ropes make the sled somewhat flexible and they move nicely over the rough ice. We do flip over sometimes and we have managed to brake the handlebars on all three sleds. We patch them up with pieces off wood and rope.

 

The runners are made out of wood with thick plastic underneath. After traveling over gravel and rocks we scrape the runners to get them smooth again.

These sleds looks a lot different than my Iditarod sled. Most race sleds are made out of aluminum and fiberglass. I steer my sled from the back, while we steer the expedition sleds mostly from the front. I also run my dogs at home in tandem, while up here we are running in a fan hitch. It is very interesting for me to experience both ways of running dogs.

After about ten days of running, pushing and dragging the sleds over rough ice, today we were finally able to put our skis back on. We are now camped on a flat area very close to Axel Heiberg. I am hoping to see some muskox while we are close to land, but I believe they are more in the valleys where there is more food for them to eat. The mountains that are surrounding us right now are basically covered with rocks and not much vegetation.

Everything is going well. It was real windy this morning, but it cleared up and got nice and sunny in the afternoon.

Happy Spring,

Sigrid

 

Sigrid_04.jpgNorwegian Translation:

4. mai 2008
Dag 36
Posisjon N 79 58 W 096 32
Distanse 25 km

Like ved en fjellhylle som tilhorer Axel Heiberg har vi satt opp teltleiren for kvelden. Jeg ser etter dyreliv, men ingen moskus, ulv, isbjorn eller rev I sikte. Ikke mye vegetasjon I fjellene rundt her, saa moskusen holder seg nok mer ned I dalene. Det er rykte om en ulveflokk paa 18 stk I Eureka, saa jeg haaper paa aa faa se snurten av dem naar vi naermer oss slutten av ekspedisjonen.

i dag kunne vi endelig ta skiene paa etter 10 dager med loping, dytting og haling over pakkisen. Det er flatere og forhaapentligvis holder det seg slik en stund.
Tobias og jeg drommer om mandelkake med eggekrem.

Sigrid

 

 


This dispatch was created and posted using Dispatch 1.0 – an expedition dispatch software developed by The Will Steger Foundation and Global Warming 101 Expeditions.

Comments

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Published in: